April 2022 TBR

April 2022 TBR

Good morning fellow bookworms! March has officially ended and the beautiful month of April has begun (also the month of my birthday, so I may be a little biased). I wrapped up my reading month a few days ago in this post, so now it’s time for the next step: setting my April TBR! I’m very much a mood reader, so the chances that I’m actually going to stick with this list are quite slim, but I hope to be able to scratch at least a few of them off!

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

This one is a no-brainer. I finished A Court of Thorns and Roses a few days ago and absolutely loved it, so naturally I am going to read the second book in the series. It’s supposed to be even better than the first book and it has a Goodreads rating of 4.61, which is absolutely crazy, so this is going to be fun!

Take A Hint, Dani Brown by Talia Hibbert

Also kind of a no-brainer, since I finished Get A Life, Chloe Brown in March, although I didn’t enjoy it all that much. I’m gonna give the second book in the series a go, but if it has more of the same unnecessarily graphic sexual content, I’m DNF’ing.

Misery by Stephen King

I’m so excited for this one, though also a little scared since it’s kind of outside of my comfort zone. I used to read a lot of (psychological) thrillers, but I’ve kind of been reading a lot of lighthearted, fun Young Adult, fantasy and romance novels, so we’ll have to see if I’m still into the thrillers. I’ll keep you posted!

November 9 by Colleen Hoover

I’ve devoured two CoHo novels in the past few months and I’ve really been wanting to get my hands on this one. I finally found this one in my local bookshop and I’m so excited. I’ve heard so many good things about it, I can’t wait.

The Comfort Book by Matt Haig

I’ve wanted to read this book for a while now, but I could only ever find Hardcover copies that cost like 25 euros and I didn’t really want to pay that much for such a tiny book, so I decided to wait. I finally found a paperback edition for 9 pounds in the airport bookshop when I was in Nottingham, so I decided to buy it! I just finished Notes on a Nervous Planet and am now reading Reasons to Stay Alive, so I’ll probably start on The Comfort Book after I finish that one. All three books have fairly short chapters, so they’re lovely books to have as a second or third read to pick up when you’ve only got a couple of minutes.

Verity by Colleen Hoover

Same story as November 9 by Colleen Hoover. I finally got my hands on this one a while ago after reading so many amazing reviews. I can’t wait to get started on this one. I’m really looking forward to Ugly Love as well, but I’ve already discovered that I can’t read too many CoHo’s in a short period of time, so it’ll have to wait a little.

Daisy Jones & the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Ever since reading The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, I’ve wanted to read Daisy Jones and the Six. I loved Evelyn Hugo and the plot of Daisy Jones sounds amazing. I finally bought a copy, so let the fun begin!

Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson

Good Girl, Bad Blood was another Birmingham Airport bookshop find and so was the third part of this series, As Good As Dead. Buy 1 get 1 50% off, baby! Anyway, I read A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder last year and absolutely loved it, so I decided that I wanted to read the rest of the series as well. Also, I challenged myself to actually finish some of the series I started this year, so I guess I have no choice!

Current Reads

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

I’m currently at page three-hundred something of the Prisoner of Azkaban for my Rereading Harry Potter series, which means that after tomorrows post, there’s going to be two more weeks/posts of the Prisoner of Azkaban, after which we’ll be starting on the Goblet of Fire. I’m so excited, shit is getting pretty Sirius!

The Twelve Dates of Christmas by Jenny Bayliss

Yes, this is weird. I started this book just before Christmas and I didn’t get the chance to finish it in time, but I don’t want to DNF, because I like the book. So I just thought I’d pick it up again so it doesn’t stay on my shelf half unread until next Christmas.

Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig

I’m about a third of the way through Reasons to Stay Alive. It’s wonderful so far and it’s probably best enjoyed when you read a couple of pages at a time during breakfast or a little coffee break or whatever.

The Gifts of Reading by Jennie Orchard

Might DNF. I’m about 16% in and I’m really bored.. It’s a series of short stories from various writers about gifting books and so far I’ve only enjoyed one of them. We’ll see.

Physical TBR

So I’ve been seeing a lot of people tracking their physical TBR and trying to reduce theirs, so I decided that I wanted to give it a go as well. I took inventory of all of my books, both physical and digital editions and counted how many books were still unread. I came to a grand total of 444 books, out of which 249 are still unread. Naturally, I put myself on a book-buying ban until at least my birthday, because this is absolutely crazy. I’m going to try to reduce my TBR and I’ll keep you guys posted!

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6 Amazing Books with LGBT-Characters

6 Amazing Books with LGBT-Characters

Hello my fellow bookworms and happy Wednesday! Welcome back for a list of 6 great reads with LGBT (main) characters. The books listed below are all books that I have read recently. I noticed that I’ve been coming across more and more LGBT-characters lately, which means that either the world is changing for the better, or I’m changing for the better (or both) that we can finally talk about gay relationships the way we talk about straight ones. I know we’re not there yet, but we’re (slowly) getting there. Let’s start with my current read and the inspiration for this post:

Red, White and Royal Blue by Casey McQuinston

I am LOVING this LGBT-romance. First son of the US holds a grudge against the Crown Prince of England. To avoid a rivalry between the two countries, they are forced to spend time together and pretend that they’re best friends. Only, you guessed it, they develop feelings for each other! I can’t tell you how it ends, because well, I haven’t finished it yet, but I’m loving the witty conversations, the teasing and the fact that it’s steamy without being uncomfortably graphic.

If you’re more into the girl/girl romance than the boy/boy romance (or you just need more LGBT romance, period), McQuinston has also written a novel about a girl who doesn’t believe in love, meeting a gorgeous old school punk rocker girl from the 1970s on the subway and deciding to help her crush return to her own time. I haven’t read it yet, but as soon as I do, I’ll make sure to write you a review.

The Trials of Apollo series by Rick Riordan

You may have guessed it, but the main character of this series is the god Apollo and I probably don’t have to tell you that the Ancient Greek didn’t exactly shy away from same-sex relationships. The fact that Apollo dated some men throughout his 4000 years is revisited quite a lot throughout the books. There are also plenty of queer demigods who have side roles in the story. Riordan does a good job incorporating LGBT-characters in his books without making a big deal about emphasising that they’re gay. It’s less “look at me being inclusive and creating gay characters!” and more, “yes I did say he has a boyfriend, why?”. Kudos for that, Rick.

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

If you haven’t read this masterpiece yet, you might be surprised that a book named “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo” ended up on a list with LGBT-books. Evelyn Hugo decides to tell her life story to a young woman who is asked to write her biography. The woman keeps asking her who Evelyn’s true love was. I hate to spoil anything, but the answer is not one of the Seven Husbands. I was in tears for most of this book. Evelyn Hugo is kind of a morally grey character, but she is so well-written that you can’t help loving her anyway.

They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera

I had completely forgotten about the fact that the main characters of this book were gay until I found it on a list of LGBT-books. The two main characters, Rufus and Matteo, start out as friends and later in the book grow into something more. It’s an important theme in the book, but not the main one. Rufus and Matteo both get a call from the Death-cast that they are going to die within the next 24 hours. They meet through an app that matches “Deckers” with a buddy to spend their death day with. They decide to spend their last day together challenging each other to do the things they’ve always wanted to do. The whole concept of the book is beautiful, but also deeply disturbing and sad. I’m still not exactly sure how I feel about this book, but it’s definitely worth a read. It’s not your typical romance, though.

Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron

200 years after the tale of Cinderella took place, girls are still required to attend the annual ball to find a suitor and get married. Only, Sophia would much rather marry Erin. She tries to get Erin to run away with her so they can build a life together, but Erin refuses. Sophia flees from the ball alone and runs into Constance, who is the last descendent of one of Cinderella’s step sisters. They decide to take down the King together and free the people from his evil reign. And OF COURSE there is a love triangle between Erin, Sophia and Constance.

I loved this book with all my heart. It was my first fairytale retelling and I wasn’t too sure about it at first, but it turned out to be amazing, though a little predictable at times. I’ll make sure to post a review of this one in the near future. DEFINITELY worth a read.

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab

I feel like I talk about this book way too much and also not enough. I put a link to my review of this book in the title for a summary of the story. Addie falls in love with both men and women over her 300-year long existence. A few of her “relationships” are described in detail. She spends her days getting to know the same person over and over again, only to be forgotten again in the morning. It’s beautiful, it’s sad, no I’m not okay.

My 2021 wrap-up: the best and worst books I’ve read this year

My 2021 wrap-up: the best and worst books I’ve read this year

Hello my fellow bookworms! And welcome to my 2021 wrap-up. I’ve made a list of the top 10 best books and worst books I’ve read in 2021. Let me know in the comments what your best and worst books of 2021 are!

In 2021, I’ve read a total of 58 books, not including the books I’m currently reading, One of Us is Next by Karen M. McManus, The Twelve Dates of Christmas by Jenny Bailyss, Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen and The Midnight Library by Matt Haig. I’m hoping to finish at least two of these in the last few days of 2021 to reach exactly 60 books (The Midnight Library is a buddy read that ends on the 31st, so I should be alright).

My list of this years’ books includes a number of Dutch books by Dutch authors with no English translation, which I’ve excluded from my list(s) of best and worse books (except for one I REALLY didn’t like). I’ll list the Dutch titles all the way at the bottom of the post for those interested.

The 10 best books I’ve read in 2021 are:

10: The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Rating: 4 out of 5.

9: From Fame to Ruin by Jina S. Bazzar

Rating: 4 out of 5.

8: Daughter of the Pirate King & Daughter of the Siren Queen by Tricia Levenseller

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

7: A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson

Rating: 4 out of 5.

6: Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

Rating: 4 out of 5.

5: Talking as Fast as I Can by Lauren Graham

Rating: 4 out of 5.

4: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

Rating: 5 out of 5.

3: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Rating: 5 out of 5.

2: It Ends With Us by Colleen Hoover

Rating: 5 out of 5.

1: The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Honourable mentions:

  • The Windsor Knot by S.J. Bennett ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • Shadow and Bone and Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • Feminists Don’t Wear Pink by Scarlett Curtis ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • The Trials of Apollo: The Hidden Oracle (#1) and The Dark Prophecy (#2) by Rick Riordan ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • The Holiday Swap by Maggie Knox ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • Blackout by Marc Elsberg ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

The worst books I’ve read in 2021

It doesn’t quite seem fair to call them the “worst” books, because I don’t think any of the books I read this year are actually bad, so let’s just call them my “least favourite” books of the year, shall we?

5: In Five Years by Rebecca Serle

Rating: 3 out of 5.

4: Empath by David M. Clark

Rating: 3 out of 5.

3: How to Avoid a Climate Disaster by Bill Gates

Rating: 3 out of 5.

2: The Duke and I by Julia Quinn

Rating: 2 out of 5.

1: Om nooit te vergeten by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

Rating: 2 out of 5.

Dutch titles I didn’t include in the ranking:

  • Small Talk Survival by Liz Luyben
  • Damn, Honey by Marie Lotte Hagen
  • Prfct by Saskia Geraerts
  • Waarom je niet zomaar moet stemmen waar je ouders op stemmen by Titia Hoogendoorn
  • Stoorzender by Arjen Lubach
  • Omdenken in communicatie by Berthold Gunster
  • Ja-maar… Omdenken by Berthold Gunster
  • Eerste hulp by hoogsensitiviteit by Elke L.S. Van Hoof
  • Een boek vol taalfouten by Friederieke de Raat
  • Happy Life 365 by Kelly Weekers