All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

Rating: 5 out of 5.
  • Fiction
  • Contemporary Romance
  • New Adult
  • Paperback
  • 305 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 4.31
  • TW: mental health, infertility

Quinn and Graham meet in an entirely improbable way that is probably not the best base for a relationship. Nevertheless, they get together and they are the absolute perfect couple. For a while, at least, until Quinn and Graham start trying to have a baby and it’s just not happening. They stop talking to each other and only have sex for the purpose of having a baby. But every month Quinn will get her period and fall apart all over again.

“If you only shine light on your flaws, all your perfects will dim.”

Colleen Hoover, All Your Perfects

Where do I even start? There are so many good things about this book. This is only my second CoHo book and I am absolutely blown away. First of all, the story is so original. The way that Quinn and Graham meet stirs up so many emotions, it really sets the tone for the rest of the book. Hoover writes her story and her characters in a way that makes you feel like you completely understand what infertility feels like without actually having experience it (luckily). It absolutely broke my heart to read about Quinn’s struggle with not being able to get pregnant. Everything that happens in this book is so well thought out. There is a box that is referred to in the story every once in a while and that keeps you curious (“What’s in the box!”). You eventually find out and it is absolutely perfect. If you must know, yes, I cried.

I’m a sucker for books with dual timelines. It keeps the story exciting and gives you exactly the information you need in a way that doesn’t get boring. Also, it keeps you from needing a therapist. Hoover has a gift for balancing the heartbreaking main story with lighthearted fun stuff from the beginning of Quinn’s and Graham’s relationship.

I came across some writing tips on Pinterest a while ago on how to write a character for your book or story. The main thing that stuck with me was that you shouldn’t make your character too perfect. An interesting character has flaws. Well, Hoover definitely has Pinterest too, because man, her characters have flaws. I’ve never written a book, but I’m guessing that creating characters is probably the most tricky part of writing. If the characters are too perfect, nobody will care, if they’re too flawed, everyone will hate them. The characters in All Your Perfects are perfectly imperfect, if that makes sense. Quinn’s mental issues that derive from not being able to get pregnant and her inability to communicate about it with Graham make her an amazing main character to a heartbreaking book. The imperfectness of Hoover’s characters is what makes this story so perfect.

Colleen Hoover is probably the most talented romance writer on earth. Her books are completely unique, unlike anything I’ve ever read before. After I read It Ends With Us, I thought “Okay, this is really good. Maybe I’ll read more CoHo books in the future, but I’ll probably only be disappointed, because nothing can match this.” I was wrong. This book was incredible, absolutely mind-blowing. If you can get your hands on this book or any CoHo book for that matter, do it. Buy it, read it, tell me what you think.

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Elevation by Stephen King – Book Review

Elevation by Stephen King – Book Review

Rating: 3 out of 5.
  • Fiction
  • “Horror”
  • Fantasy
  • Paperback
  • 192 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 3.67

Oh boy, did I have high expectations for this one. My very first Stephen King novel! I picked Elevation because I came across it at a bookstore once and it looked interesting. Also it was the shortest Stephen King novel I had come across so far. I have wanted to read Stephen King for ever, but the books are so ridiculously big (IT by Stephen King is 1116 pages, just to name one) that I was just kind of scared to. So when I came across this one, I figured: it couldn’t hurt to start with this one, right? Before I share my thoughts on this book, I’ll give you a short summary of the plot.

Scott Carey has been losing weight steadily for the past few weeks. He was delighted at first, only he doesn’t look any different than he did 30 pounds ago. And then there’s something else. When he steps onto the scale while holding all sorts of heavy things, he weighs exactly the same as he does naked. Scott consults with his best friend Bob Ellis, who is a retired doctor. As Scott keeps losing weight, he wonders what will happen when he reaches zero pounds..

So let’s begin by discussing the fact that this book won the 2018 Goodreads Choice Awards for the category horror. I’m sorry, but this is not a horror story. Mystery, okay. Sci-fi, sure, a little. Even fantasy is more believable, but please. Calling this a horror story, is an insult to actual horror stories.

Elevation only has a few characters that are introduced throughout the book, which makes sense since there aren’t enough pages to introduce any more. If you ask me, the story could’ve been a little longer. The story wasn’t at all bad, but the characters were extremely flat. There’s a lesbian couple who owns a restaurant that is going bankrupt because the whole town consists of Trumpies, so nobody wants to eat there. The couple’s dogs shit on Scott’s lawn and every time he tries to confront them about it, they tell him he just hates them, because they’re a same-sex couple. Extremely flat and uninspired. I’m not denying there are still (sadly) plenty of people who think like that, but this is just a very bad stereotype. Of course all the other characters are rich, middle-aged white guys and white church-going housewives.

The part that bothered me most, though, was the fact that you don’t get any explanation as to what caused Scott’s condition. If something weird is happening to your body, you want to know why, right? I would! But Scott just accepts that he is probably going to float away when he reaches zero and that’s that. The ending was probably the most disappointing part of the whole book to me.

The keyword in this review is obviously “disappointed”. This story could’ve been epic, if King had put in a little effort. Honestly, it feels like he had a deadline to make and he had something laying on a shelf somewhere and decided to just hand that to his publisher without even looking at it. There’s Stephen King on the front cover, so people will read it anyway, right? I could see that his writing is amazing, or at least could be amazing. I’m still planning on reading more Stephen King novels (I’ve got Misery and 11.22.63 waiting on my bookshelf), but I might wait a little bit.

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