Review: November 9 by Colleen Hoover

Review: November 9 by Colleen Hoover

Rating: 4 out of 5.
  • New adult, contemporary romance
  • Fiction
  • Paperback
  • 310 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 4.34

The day before Fallon is moving across the country, she is saved from a disastrous lunch with her father by Ben, an aspiring novelist who is having lunch at the same restaurant by sheer coincidence. They spend Fallon’s last hours in L.A. together and decide to let each other live their lives, but meet up every year on the same date, November 9th. After 5 years, they will either stop or decide to be together, but a lot can happen in 5 years.

This was definitely NOT my favourite CoHo so far. Every new CoHo book I read is automatically my new favourite CoHo, except for this one. I thought it would be,I have been so curious about this book for ages and I was really, really looking forward to reading it. I did actually end up finishing it within 12 hours and it completely had me under its spell for hours and hours, BUT… the ending. I was so disappointed. But we’ll get back to that.

Let’s start with the dual POV; I loved it. CoHo is the queen of dual timelines and dual POV’s, she knows exactly how to use them to add extra drama and tension to the story and make sure you want to keep reading. Sadly, CoHo decided to incorporate a little miscommunication trope in this book, which I think is pretty common in dual POV stories, since you can see into the minds of multiple people. Miscommunication is one of my least favourite tropes because of the sheer frustration it comes with (“But she secretly loves you, why can’t you see that! Don’t run off with someone else because you think she isn’t interested anymore!”). So I wasn’t a big fan of that, but it is not the main trope, so I could kind of ignore it.

I absolutely loved the November 9 thing. I am a very impatient woman, so I love books that cover a larger period of time. That way you don’t have to wait 400 pages to find out what happens to them over the years. I mean, I want to know about Fallon’s life, but I like getting a recap more than having to read through an entire year of her life. I think it really kept up the pace of the book and made it fun to read.

Let’s talk about the plot. CoHo never ceases to amaze with the originality of the plot. She always seems to find the perfect balance between writing a romance worthy of envy and a story that is deeply disturbing on so many levels. In characters too, she finds the perfect balance between perfection and flaws. She managed to do it in this book as well for like.. 90%, until you get to the end and the level of toxicity just.. I don’t even have words for it. I don’t want to spoil anything, so I’ll just say that throughout the book, Ben gives off a few red flags that probably would’ve made me very uncomfortable and likely would’ve made me run for the hills. But since it’s CoHo, you accept it, because she probably has a completely reasonable explanation for all this.

Which brings us to the ending. Let’s just say the explanation wasn’t exactly reasonable. I personally feel like the ending is definitely on the wrong side of the toxic line. I really wish she had either changed Bens motives or had let Fallon make a different decision, because this was just disturbing.

I know a lot of people love this book, including the ending, but the ending was just too toxic for me. The entire book was a definite 5-star read, but the last few pages just ruined it for me. Maybe the 4 stars are still a little generous, but I really did enjoy reading the book very much. Except for those last 10 pages.

, , ,

All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

Rating: 5 out of 5.
  • Fiction
  • Contemporary Romance
  • New Adult
  • Paperback
  • 305 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 4.31
  • TW: mental health, infertility

Quinn and Graham meet in an entirely improbable way that is probably not the best base for a relationship. Nevertheless, they get together and they are the absolute perfect couple. For a while, at least, until Quinn and Graham start trying to have a baby and it’s just not happening. They stop talking to each other and only have sex for the purpose of having a baby. But every month Quinn will get her period and fall apart all over again.

“If you only shine light on your flaws, all your perfects will dim.”

Colleen Hoover, All Your Perfects

Where do I even start? There are so many good things about this book. This is only my second CoHo book and I am absolutely blown away. First of all, the story is so original. The way that Quinn and Graham meet stirs up so many emotions, it really sets the tone for the rest of the book. Hoover writes her story and her characters in a way that makes you feel like you completely understand what infertility feels like without actually having experience it (luckily). It absolutely broke my heart to read about Quinn’s struggle with not being able to get pregnant. Everything that happens in this book is so well thought out. There is a box that is referred to in the story every once in a while and that keeps you curious (“What’s in the box!”). You eventually find out and it is absolutely perfect. If you must know, yes, I cried.

I’m a sucker for books with dual timelines. It keeps the story exciting and gives you exactly the information you need in a way that doesn’t get boring. Also, it keeps you from needing a therapist. Hoover has a gift for balancing the heartbreaking main story with lighthearted fun stuff from the beginning of Quinn’s and Graham’s relationship.

I came across some writing tips on Pinterest a while ago on how to write a character for your book or story. The main thing that stuck with me was that you shouldn’t make your character too perfect. An interesting character has flaws. Well, Hoover definitely has Pinterest too, because man, her characters have flaws. I’ve never written a book, but I’m guessing that creating characters is probably the most tricky part of writing. If the characters are too perfect, nobody will care, if they’re too flawed, everyone will hate them. The characters in All Your Perfects are perfectly imperfect, if that makes sense. Quinn’s mental issues that derive from not being able to get pregnant and her inability to communicate about it with Graham make her an amazing main character to a heartbreaking book. The imperfectness of Hoover’s characters is what makes this story so perfect.

Colleen Hoover is probably the most talented romance writer on earth. Her books are completely unique, unlike anything I’ve ever read before. After I read It Ends With Us, I thought “Okay, this is really good. Maybe I’ll read more CoHo books in the future, but I’ll probably only be disappointed, because nothing can match this.” I was wrong. This book was incredible, absolutely mind-blowing. If you can get your hands on this book or any CoHo book for that matter, do it. Buy it, read it, tell me what you think.

, ,

It Ends With Us Book Review

It Ends With Us Book Review

,

Rating: 5 out of 5.
  • Fiction
  • Contemporary Romance
  • Paperback
  • 376 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 4.44
  • TW: Physical/domestic abuse

“Sometimes it is the one who loves you who hurts you the most.”

Colleen Hoover, It Ends With Us

Lily is a young woman from a small town in Maine. When she is fifteen years old, she befriends and later falls in love with Atlas Corrigan, a teenage boy who was kicked out by his father and is now living in an abandoned house across from Lily’s bedroom window. After Atlas moves in with his uncle in Boston, Lily never hears from him again. Lily moves to Boston years later to go to college and start her own business. She meets Ryle Kincaid, the gorgeous neurosurgeon, on a rooftop. Ryle has a strict “no dating” policy, though. While Lily builds her new business, she starts thinking about her new relationship and thoughts of her first love enter her mind. Then Atlas suddenly reappears.

Reading this book was an absolute emotional rollercoaster. I cried, I laughed and then I cried some more. I had expected that I would go through this in one sitting, but I just couldn’t. Every now and then I had to put it down and make myself some camomile tea to calm my nerves. Colleen Hoover really deserves a pat on the back for this one. No wonder a cult has been forming around her on Bookstagram and Booktok. I have a very deep respect for her as an author.

Lily Bloom is such a wonderful character. She is so well-written and so relatable. The fact that you get glimpses into her diary and her life when she was 15 years-old really makes her character come to life. Ryle’s character was written beautifully as well. His life story absolutely broke my heart. I could actually feel all the blood drain from my face when I read it. I kept rooting for Ryle until the very end. The only character I wasn’t too fond of was Atlas.. It may be an unpopular opinion, but I just did not like him very much. I love his name, though.

The story of It Ends With Us is so well thought of, so original and such a brave story to tell, considering that it was (loosely) based on Colleen Hoover’s life. I’m not sure how much of the story was based on her life, but nevertheless my heart aches for her.

Colleen Hoover did everything right in this book. The glimpses into the past were in all the right places, the characters were perfectly imperfect, the storyline was amazing and well-balanced between incredibly romantic, funny and absolutely heartbreaking. As far as contemporary romances go, this is definitely not your typical one. Don’t read this expecting your typical fairytale love story, because it is not. Sure, there is plenty of romance, but it comes with an equally big share of heartbreak and hurt, for both the characters ánd you.

I would absolutely advise everyone to read this book, just beware of the trigger warnings. It’s not just a few scenes you can skip, it’s the whole book that is lined with triggers.

,

My 2021 wrap-up: the best and worst books I’ve read this year

My 2021 wrap-up: the best and worst books I’ve read this year

Hello my fellow bookworms! And welcome to my 2021 wrap-up. I’ve made a list of the top 10 best books and worst books I’ve read in 2021. Let me know in the comments what your best and worst books of 2021 are!

In 2021, I’ve read a total of 58 books, not including the books I’m currently reading, One of Us is Next by Karen M. McManus, The Twelve Dates of Christmas by Jenny Bailyss, Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen and The Midnight Library by Matt Haig. I’m hoping to finish at least two of these in the last few days of 2021 to reach exactly 60 books (The Midnight Library is a buddy read that ends on the 31st, so I should be alright).

My list of this years’ books includes a number of Dutch books by Dutch authors with no English translation, which I’ve excluded from my list(s) of best and worse books (except for one I REALLY didn’t like). I’ll list the Dutch titles all the way at the bottom of the post for those interested.

The 10 best books I’ve read in 2021 are:

10: The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Rating: 4 out of 5.

9: From Fame to Ruin by Jina S. Bazzar

Rating: 4 out of 5.

8: Daughter of the Pirate King & Daughter of the Siren Queen by Tricia Levenseller

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

7: A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson

Rating: 4 out of 5.

6: Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

Rating: 4 out of 5.

5: Talking as Fast as I Can by Lauren Graham

Rating: 4 out of 5.

4: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

Rating: 5 out of 5.

3: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Rating: 5 out of 5.

2: It Ends With Us by Colleen Hoover

Rating: 5 out of 5.

1: The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Honourable mentions:

  • The Windsor Knot by S.J. Bennett ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • Shadow and Bone and Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • Feminists Don’t Wear Pink by Scarlett Curtis ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • The Trials of Apollo: The Hidden Oracle (#1) and The Dark Prophecy (#2) by Rick Riordan ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • The Holiday Swap by Maggie Knox ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • Blackout by Marc Elsberg ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

The worst books I’ve read in 2021

It doesn’t quite seem fair to call them the “worst” books, because I don’t think any of the books I read this year are actually bad, so let’s just call them my “least favourite” books of the year, shall we?

5: In Five Years by Rebecca Serle

Rating: 3 out of 5.

4: Empath by David M. Clark

Rating: 3 out of 5.

3: How to Avoid a Climate Disaster by Bill Gates

Rating: 3 out of 5.

2: The Duke and I by Julia Quinn

Rating: 2 out of 5.

1: Om nooit te vergeten by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

Rating: 2 out of 5.

Dutch titles I didn’t include in the ranking:

  • Small Talk Survival by Liz Luyben
  • Damn, Honey by Marie Lotte Hagen
  • Prfct by Saskia Geraerts
  • Waarom je niet zomaar moet stemmen waar je ouders op stemmen by Titia Hoogendoorn
  • Stoorzender by Arjen Lubach
  • Omdenken in communicatie by Berthold Gunster
  • Ja-maar… Omdenken by Berthold Gunster
  • Eerste hulp by hoogsensitiviteit by Elke L.S. Van Hoof
  • Een boek vol taalfouten by Friederieke de Raat
  • Happy Life 365 by Kelly Weekers