My Sister, The Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

My Sister, The Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

  • Fiction
  • Thriller/mystery
  • Humor
  • Paperback
  • 226 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 3.72

Rating: 4 out of 5.

“It takes a whole lot longer to dispose of a body than to dispose of a soul, especially if you don’t want to leave any evidence of foul play.”

Oyinkan Braithwaite, My Sister, the Serial Killer

Korede’s sister Ayoola is the favourite child, the most beautiful of the two and possibly a little sociopathic. Two of Ayoola’s boyfriends have mysteriously died before and now her third boyfriend is dead. Self-defence, apparently. It is also the third mess that Ayoola has left for Korede to clean up. Korede takes the burden of cleaning up the blood, getting rid of the body and stopping Ayoola from posting Instagram pictures while she should be mourning her “missing” boyfriend. After all, to Korede family always comes first. Until Ayoola starts dating the handsome doctor that Korede has been in love with for years. Korede is faced with the question how far she would go to protect her sister.

I enjoyed this book a lot. It had been on my shelf for years before I decided to pick it up, mostly because I thought it was a completely different kind of book. I finally picked it up after I coincidentally came across a review of the book somewhere and I realised it wasn’t at all the kind of book I thought it was. Why did I buy a book without reading the summary and then put it on my shelf for two years because I didn’t like the kind of book I thought it was, you ask? Well, I never said I was perfect.

“I dare you to find a flaw in her beauty; or to bring forth a woman who can stand beside her without wilting.”

Oyinkan Braithwaite, My Sister, the Serial Killer

I adored the characters in this book. They were hilarious and vibrant and there really wasn’t a dull moment. The book is written from Korede’s point of view, so you don’t really know what is going on in Ayoola’s head, but not knowing what she is thinking is a large part of the fun, otherwise it wouldn’t be a mystery. It was kind of a cliché that Korede is the “ugly duckling” and her sister is the beautiful, but naive one and that kind of bothered me a few times throughout the book, but I guess it also adds an extra dimension and I can’t really think of a different relationship that would add the same dimension to their interactions. So I guess I forgive her for the cliché.

The book was very accessible. The chapters were short and sweet, it wasn’t too difficult to read, the writing is smooth and witty and I went through it quickly, which made it very enjoyable. I hate mystery novels or thrillers where you have to wait endlessly for a clue or for someone to solve the mystery while the narrator takes it upon themselves to describe where a character got their completely unrelated and irrelevant dog Fluffy or the EXACT colour of the leaves on an even more irrelevant tree (I’m looking at you, George R.R. Martin). This is definitely not that kind of book. My Sister, the Serial Killer is fast-paced while always making you want to keep reading and if you love reading a book in one session, you’ll adore this book.

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Twenties Girl by Sophie Kinsella

Twenties Girl by Sophie Kinsella

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  • Fiction
  • Contemporary romance
  • Humor
  • Paperback
  • 496 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 3.84

Rating: 5 out of 5.

“Life is like an escalator. You see, it carries you on regardless. And you might as well enjoy the view and seize every opportunity while you’re passing. Otherwise, it’ll be too late.”

Sophie Kinsella, Twenties Girl

While Lara Lington is attending her great-aunt Sadie’s funeral, she is visited by Sadie’s ghost in the form a demanding girl in a 1920’s flapper dress. Sadie demands that Lara finds a necklace that had been in Sadies possession for seventy-five years, but was lost when she died. Lara refuses at first, being busy enough with her own troubles, having just been dumped by the love of her life and trying to keep her head above water as co-owner of her headhunting agency. Sadie keeps pestering Lara until she finally agrees on finding the necklace, uncovering some ugly secrets in the process.

This is the second Sophie Kinsella book I read. It’s also still one of my favourites (if not, THE favourite). The first Kinsella book I read is “Finding Audrey”, which is absolutely beautiful, but meant for a younger audience. I’ll write a review on that one soon.

Even though this book is 500 pages long, I literally devoured it. I love Kinsella, because her books are always light and easy to read. They really pull you into the story. She has a talent for making you feel like you’re really there. She doesn’t dwell on irrelevant things like the exact colour of a tree (which can absolutely be beautiful and relevant in a different kind of novel, obviously).

I loved the friendship between Sadie and Lara that evolved throughout the book. Lara started off being really annoyed by Sadie and naturally, I was really annoyed by Sadie as well, but Kinsella did an excellent job peeling off the layers of Sadie’s personality. Every time you learn something new, you start loving her a little more. The dynamic between Sadie and Lara is amazing. It’s enemies to friends, but Sadie also takes a role as a mentor. Being 105 years-old, she has a lot to teach Lara, though some of it is a little outdated…

“If a love affair is one-sided, then it’s only ever a question, never an answer. You can’t live your life waiting for an answer.”

Sophie Kinsella, Twenties Girl

There’s one theme that keeps coming back throughout the novel and that’s unanswered love. It wasn’t that obvious to me while I was reading the book and I really don’t remember it being featured so prominently. I only just noticed while looking up the quotes for this review. Nearly all of the quotes on Goodreads are about unanswered love. It’s Sadie telling Lara to stop waiting for her ex to start loving her back, that it’s not possible to make someone love you. She tells her to stop trailing after her ex. I didn’t mind the theme so much in this novel, but Kinsella does have a habit of making some of her main characters annoyingly dependent on men.

“Honestly, it’s so easy to get what you want from people if they think you’re a psycho.”

Sophie Kinsella, Twenties Girl

If you’ve never read anything by Sophie Kinsella before, consider this a sign to pick up Twenties Girl at your nearest bookstore and dive in. If you’re not really a fan of the paranormal element in this novel, I would recommend starting with “My Not so Perfect Life”. I’ll do a review on that gem soon.

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