6 Amazing Books with LGBT-Characters

6 Amazing Books with LGBT-Characters

Hello my fellow bookworms and happy Wednesday! Welcome back for a list of 6 great reads with LGBT (main) characters. The books listed below are all books that I have read recently. I noticed that I’ve been coming across more and more LGBT-characters lately, which means that either the world is changing for the better, or I’m changing for the better (or both) that we can finally talk about gay relationships the way we talk about straight ones. I know we’re not there yet, but we’re (slowly) getting there. Let’s start with my current read and the inspiration for this post:

Red, White and Royal Blue by Casey McQuinston

I am LOVING this LGBT-romance. First son of the US holds a grudge against the Crown Prince of England. To avoid a rivalry between the two countries, they are forced to spend time together and pretend that they’re best friends. Only, you guessed it, they develop feelings for each other! I can’t tell you how it ends, because well, I haven’t finished it yet, but I’m loving the witty conversations, the teasing and the fact that it’s steamy without being uncomfortably graphic.

If you’re more into the girl/girl romance than the boy/boy romance (or you just need more LGBT romance, period), McQuinston has also written a novel about a girl who doesn’t believe in love, meeting a gorgeous old school punk rocker girl from the 1970s on the subway and deciding to help her crush return to her own time. I haven’t read it yet, but as soon as I do, I’ll make sure to write you a review.

The Trials of Apollo series by Rick Riordan

You may have guessed it, but the main character of this series is the god Apollo and I probably don’t have to tell you that the Ancient Greek didn’t exactly shy away from same-sex relationships. The fact that Apollo dated some men throughout his 4000 years is revisited quite a lot throughout the books. There are also plenty of queer demigods who have side roles in the story. Riordan does a good job incorporating LGBT-characters in his books without making a big deal about emphasising that they’re gay. It’s less “look at me being inclusive and creating gay characters!” and more, “yes I did say he has a boyfriend, why?”. Kudos for that, Rick.

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

If you haven’t read this masterpiece yet, you might be surprised that a book named “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo” ended up on a list with LGBT-books. Evelyn Hugo decides to tell her life story to a young woman who is asked to write her biography. The woman keeps asking her who Evelyn’s true love was. I hate to spoil anything, but the answer is not one of the Seven Husbands. I was in tears for most of this book. Evelyn Hugo is kind of a morally grey character, but she is so well-written that you can’t help loving her anyway.

They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera

I had completely forgotten about the fact that the main characters of this book were gay until I found it on a list of LGBT-books. The two main characters, Rufus and Matteo, start out as friends and later in the book grow into something more. It’s an important theme in the book, but not the main one. Rufus and Matteo both get a call from the Death-cast that they are going to die within the next 24 hours. They meet through an app that matches “Deckers” with a buddy to spend their death day with. They decide to spend their last day together challenging each other to do the things they’ve always wanted to do. The whole concept of the book is beautiful, but also deeply disturbing and sad. I’m still not exactly sure how I feel about this book, but it’s definitely worth a read. It’s not your typical romance, though.

Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron

200 years after the tale of Cinderella took place, girls are still required to attend the annual ball to find a suitor and get married. Only, Sophia would much rather marry Erin. She tries to get Erin to run away with her so they can build a life together, but Erin refuses. Sophia flees from the ball alone and runs into Constance, who is the last descendent of one of Cinderella’s step sisters. They decide to take down the King together and free the people from his evil reign. And OF COURSE there is a love triangle between Erin, Sophia and Constance.

I loved this book with all my heart. It was my first fairytale retelling and I wasn’t too sure about it at first, but it turned out to be amazing, though a little predictable at times. I’ll make sure to post a review of this one in the near future. DEFINITELY worth a read.

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab

I feel like I talk about this book way too much and also not enough. I put a link to my review of this book in the title for a summary of the story. Addie falls in love with both men and women over her 300-year long existence. A few of her “relationships” are described in detail. She spends her days getting to know the same person over and over again, only to be forgotten again in the morning. It’s beautiful, it’s sad, no I’m not okay.

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab

  • Historical Fiction
  • Fantasy/Magical realism
  • Hardcover
  • 560 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 4.24

Rating: 5 out of 5.

I have been putting off reviewing this beautiful piece of art, because I just knew I would never be able to write a review that would do this book justice. I read this book almost 9 months ago and I haven’t found any book that surpasses it yet, nor do I think I ever will. I would probably sell my soul to be able to read it for the first time again (though not to the Gods that answer after dark). But alright, here we go.

“Never pray to the Gods that answer after dark.”

V.E. Schwab, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

In the year 1714, a young woman named Adeline LaRue makes a bargain with the devil to be free. From that moment on, though, she is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets, as soon as she is out of sight. For 300 years, she walks the earth without being able to leave a single trace, until she walks into a second hand bookshop in New York to exchange the book she just stole from there the day before.

“If you only walk in other people’s steps, you cannot make your own way. You cannot leave a mark.”

V.E. Schwab, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

I have to be honest, I cried throughout most of the book. Every time Addie is forgotten by.someone she has grown to care about, every time she tries to leave a mark on the world that fades away after just a few seconds, every time the devil tells her to give up on life, because nobody will every remember who she is.

This was actually the very first book I read because of Bookstagram. I came across a reel of a girl describing the plot of the book and saying it was the best book she had ever read. She was so passionate about it that I decided to read it too. It was everything I had hoped it would be and more.

It’s a slow-paced story, but it captivated me from the very beginning. The story starts in 1714 with Addie running for her life. From then on it alternates between the past, starting in 1714 and working your way up throughout Addie’s 300 year long life while Addie figures out how her new life works, and the present, where she goes through life stealthy, knowing the exact moment she’ll be forgotten.

I’ve literally never read anything like this, but if I had to compare it to something, it would be the movie The Age of Adaline (the name is probably a coincidence). This is a movie featuring Blake Lively, about a young woman born in 1908, who gets hit by lightning at age 29 and from then on never ages a day again.

Shortly before publishing this book, Victoria Schwab posted on Goodreads the following words: “I can’t believe we made it. Addie spent so many years haunting me, I hope she haunts a few of you.

Oh Victoria, you have no idea.

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