Review: November 9 by Colleen Hoover

Review: November 9 by Colleen Hoover

Rating: 4 out of 5.
  • New adult, contemporary romance
  • Fiction
  • Paperback
  • 310 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 4.34

The day before Fallon is moving across the country, she is saved from a disastrous lunch with her father by Ben, an aspiring novelist who is having lunch at the same restaurant by sheer coincidence. They spend Fallon’s last hours in L.A. together and decide to let each other live their lives, but meet up every year on the same date, November 9th. After 5 years, they will either stop or decide to be together, but a lot can happen in 5 years.

This was definitely NOT my favourite CoHo so far. Every new CoHo book I read is automatically my new favourite CoHo, except for this one. I thought it would be,I have been so curious about this book for ages and I was really, really looking forward to reading it. I did actually end up finishing it within 12 hours and it completely had me under its spell for hours and hours, BUT… the ending. I was so disappointed. But we’ll get back to that.

Let’s start with the dual POV; I loved it. CoHo is the queen of dual timelines and dual POV’s, she knows exactly how to use them to add extra drama and tension to the story and make sure you want to keep reading. Sadly, CoHo decided to incorporate a little miscommunication trope in this book, which I think is pretty common in dual POV stories, since you can see into the minds of multiple people. Miscommunication is one of my least favourite tropes because of the sheer frustration it comes with (“But she secretly loves you, why can’t you see that! Don’t run off with someone else because you think she isn’t interested anymore!”). So I wasn’t a big fan of that, but it is not the main trope, so I could kind of ignore it.

I absolutely loved the November 9 thing. I am a very impatient woman, so I love books that cover a larger period of time. That way you don’t have to wait 400 pages to find out what happens to them over the years. I mean, I want to know about Fallon’s life, but I like getting a recap more than having to read through an entire year of her life. I think it really kept up the pace of the book and made it fun to read.

Let’s talk about the plot. CoHo never ceases to amaze with the originality of the plot. She always seems to find the perfect balance between writing a romance worthy of envy and a story that is deeply disturbing on so many levels. In characters too, she finds the perfect balance between perfection and flaws. She managed to do it in this book as well for like.. 90%, until you get to the end and the level of toxicity just.. I don’t even have words for it. I don’t want to spoil anything, so I’ll just say that throughout the book, Ben gives off a few red flags that probably would’ve made me very uncomfortable and likely would’ve made me run for the hills. But since it’s CoHo, you accept it, because she probably has a completely reasonable explanation for all this.

Which brings us to the ending. Let’s just say the explanation wasn’t exactly reasonable. I personally feel like the ending is definitely on the wrong side of the toxic line. I really wish she had either changed Bens motives or had let Fallon make a different decision, because this was just disturbing.

I know a lot of people love this book, including the ending, but the ending was just too toxic for me. The entire book was a definite 5-star read, but the last few pages just ruined it for me. Maybe the 4 stars are still a little generous, but I really did enjoy reading the book very much. Except for those last 10 pages.

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Mini Review: The Twelve Dates of Christmas by Jenny Bayliss

Mini Review: The Twelve Dates of Christmas by Jenny Bayliss

Rating: 2 out of 5.
  • Christmas Romance
  • Fiction
  • Paperback
  • 433 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 3.63

Since this was a DNF for me, there’s not really a point in me writing a full on review, so I’m just going to keep this short. I DNF’ed at about 63%, I guess. The book really wasn’t at all bad, but it was literally the slowest romance I have ever read. I started reading this just before Christmas, but underestimated the length of the book, so I tried to finish it for about 4 months after Christmas, but I just couldn’t work my way through it. It’s like Bayliss thinks she is fricking Tolkien, describing every single snowflake and leaf in the book.

The concept of the book is pretty cool. Kate signs herself up for a program called “The Twelve Dates of Christmas”, which makes her do 12 dates with 12 different guys that have all been screened for compatibility. This sounds like a lot of fun, right? Yeah, except it takes FOREVER to get through the dates. Especially since I was pretty sure I already knew who she was going to end up with. I finally got tired of working my way through pages and pages of irrelevant information and decided to just check if I was right about the ending and then DNF. For the record: I was right.

The book was kind of fun, so if you’re a quick reader and you have plenty of patience, you would probably enjoy this. If that does not describe you, pick a different Christmas romance, something quicker and sweeter. I’ll make sure to recommend some before the Christmas reading season starts.

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Rereading Harry Potter – Week 14

Rereading Harry Potter – Week 14

Hi fellow bookworms! Thank you for clicking on the second to last Prisoner of Azkaban post. We are so close to the exciting finale that I pretty much know by heart (the movie version anyway). I decided to cut the final 130 pages into two posts, since it would otherwise become way too long. Let’s get started!

We left off at Gryffindor finally winning the Quidditch Cup. Wood and McGonagall are over the moon and so is pretty much everyone except Slytherin house. By now it’s June and everyone is getting ready to take their exams. The Astronomy exam is being held at midnight and how cool is that? I wish I had a class like Astronomy when I was in school, but no, it was all maths and geography for me. During History of Magic, Harry writes down pretty much everything that Florean Fortescue had ever told him about medieval witch hunts. That seems about right, I remember learning more French in one week of Duolingo than I did in 6 years at school. It seems like Hogwarts, sadly, has the same problem. Is this a dig at the school system? I don’t know about the school system in the UK, but the Dutch one could definitely use an upgrade.

The Divination exam with Professor Trelawney is next. She tests every student individually. When Harry is finished with his exam, Trelawney suddenly starts predicting the rise of the Dark Lord with the help of his servant’s aid, who will be freed TONIGHT. Boy, are we in for an eventful evening. The events from here on out have always been one of my favourites from the entire series. I’m so excited!

‘My boy, you may well be seeing the outcome of poor Hagrid’s trouble with the Ministry of Magic! Look closer… does the Hippogriff appear to… have its head?’

Professor Trelawney, Harry Potter and the prisoner of Azkaban

Meanwhile, Buckbeak’s appeal has taken place and sadly, Hagrid has lost, which means that Buckbeak will be executed at sunset. Despite the fact that Hagrid told them not to come, they decide to retrieve the Invisibility Cloak from the secret passage (or rather, send Hermione, because Snape will be ready to give them detention the minute they come near that statue) and go see Hagrid anyway. They find Scabbers in one of the pots at Hagrid’s house and Ron apologises to Hermione. Fudge, Dumbledore and the executioner arrive at Hagrid’s hut, so the golden trio slip on their Invisibility Cloak and start making their way back to the castle. When they’re halfway to the castle, they hear the swish and thud of an axe from the direction of Hagrid’s hut, which means that Buckbeak must have been executed.. Even though I know that it was just a pumpkin that lost its head, because naturally they are going to rescue Buckbeak (or going to have rescued or whatever), this moment still gets me every time!

Then Scabbers makes a run for it in the direction of the Whomping Willow. Enter Crookshanks and the Grim, two seemingly unlikely bff’s and also a very cool name for a pet store. The big black dog drags Ron into a tunnel at the base of the Whomping Willow. Crookshanks touches a knot at the base of the trunk, which makes the Whomping Willow relax all of its branches, so that Harry and Hermione can cross safely. They enter the tunnel and follow it all the way to a dark landing with an open door. They enter the room and find Ron, with Scabbers in his lap. But where is the dog? Plot twist! There is no dog! The dog is in fact Sirius Black!

Harry wants to kill Sirius asap, but Sirius makes him listen to the whole story of the betrayal of his parents first. Lupin barges in and interrupts Sirius, though (rude). He was looking at the Marauder’s Map and suddenly saw Peter Pettigrew appear, which was naturally a little odd, since he’s supposed to be dead and everything. I can’t help but wonder, is Hagrid’s hut on the map? Do you think Pettigrew was hiding in there because it isn’t on the map? Could be.. Lupin reveals that Scabbers is indeed not a rat, but a wizard by the name of Peter Pettigrew. How scarred do you think Ron is after finding out he has been sharing a bed with a middle-aged wizard for 12 years?

Meanwhile, Hermione proves yet again that she’s the brightest witch of her age by deducing that they must be in the Shrieking Shack and also, Lupin is a Werewolf. Frankly, I’m a little disappointed that she is the only one who figured out that Lupin is a werewolf, with Lupin getting sick every full moon and his boggart changing into full moon and everything. Lupin’s friends became Animagi to be there for him during a full moon, when he went up to the Shrieking Shack to sit out his transformation. If they went with him as humans, they would’ve probably died, but as animals, Lupin would not harm them. The Whomping Willow and the tunnels that lead to the Shrieking Shack were all put there for Lupin’s use, so that he could safely go to Hogwarts and not, you know, kill anyone.

Snape joins the party too, hidden under the Invisibility Cloak that the golden trio had left lying around. Earlier in the book, Snape told Harry that his father did indeed save Snape’s life, but only because he had put his life at risk in the first place. Lupin tells them the whole story: Snape had always been curious about what the four of them were up to and one day Sirius tricked him into going up to the Whomping Willow during a full moon. James stopped him from meeting his maker by the hands (claws) of a fully grown werewolf.

Snape tries to hand Sirius over to the Dementors, but Harry takes him out in stead so that Sirius and Lupin can finally finish their explanation. It is revealed that Sirius was in fact not the Secret Keeper, but had made Peter the Secret Keeper, because they would never go after him. With a flash of blue light, they make Scabbers transform back into Peter Pettigrew.

That’s it for this week! Next week will be the grand finale to Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. I’m looking forward to it so much, the ending to this book is one of my favourites from the entire series. Subscribe if you want to be kept up to date on the rest of the series! I’ll see you all next week!

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All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

Rating: 5 out of 5.
  • Fiction
  • Contemporary Romance
  • New Adult
  • Paperback
  • 305 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 4.31
  • TW: mental health, infertility

Quinn and Graham meet in an entirely improbable way that is probably not the best base for a relationship. Nevertheless, they get together and they are the absolute perfect couple. For a while, at least, until Quinn and Graham start trying to have a baby and it’s just not happening. They stop talking to each other and only have sex for the purpose of having a baby. But every month Quinn will get her period and fall apart all over again.

“If you only shine light on your flaws, all your perfects will dim.”

Colleen Hoover, All Your Perfects

Where do I even start? There are so many good things about this book. This is only my second CoHo book and I am absolutely blown away. First of all, the story is so original. The way that Quinn and Graham meet stirs up so many emotions, it really sets the tone for the rest of the book. Hoover writes her story and her characters in a way that makes you feel like you completely understand what infertility feels like without actually having experience it (luckily). It absolutely broke my heart to read about Quinn’s struggle with not being able to get pregnant. Everything that happens in this book is so well thought out. There is a box that is referred to in the story every once in a while and that keeps you curious (“What’s in the box!”). You eventually find out and it is absolutely perfect. If you must know, yes, I cried.

I’m a sucker for books with dual timelines. It keeps the story exciting and gives you exactly the information you need in a way that doesn’t get boring. Also, it keeps you from needing a therapist. Hoover has a gift for balancing the heartbreaking main story with lighthearted fun stuff from the beginning of Quinn’s and Graham’s relationship.

I came across some writing tips on Pinterest a while ago on how to write a character for your book or story. The main thing that stuck with me was that you shouldn’t make your character too perfect. An interesting character has flaws. Well, Hoover definitely has Pinterest too, because man, her characters have flaws. I’ve never written a book, but I’m guessing that creating characters is probably the most tricky part of writing. If the characters are too perfect, nobody will care, if they’re too flawed, everyone will hate them. The characters in All Your Perfects are perfectly imperfect, if that makes sense. Quinn’s mental issues that derive from not being able to get pregnant and her inability to communicate about it with Graham make her an amazing main character to a heartbreaking book. The imperfectness of Hoover’s characters is what makes this story so perfect.

Colleen Hoover is probably the most talented romance writer on earth. Her books are completely unique, unlike anything I’ve ever read before. After I read It Ends With Us, I thought “Okay, this is really good. Maybe I’ll read more CoHo books in the future, but I’ll probably only be disappointed, because nothing can match this.” I was wrong. This book was incredible, absolutely mind-blowing. If you can get your hands on this book or any CoHo book for that matter, do it. Buy it, read it, tell me what you think.

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Get A Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert

Get A Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert

Rating: 3 out of 5.
  • Fiction
  • Contemporary romance, chick lit
  • Ebook
  • 384 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 3.86

In Get A Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert, Chloe Brown sets herself a challenge to.. well, get a life. Chloe is a chronically ill computer geek who finally moved out of her parents house after almost dying and composing a list of six directives to help her get a life. Number one was moving out: check! Now she has to enjoy a drunken night out, have meaningless sex and go camping, among other things. She has no idea how she’s going to cross all those things off her list, until she meets the building’s superintendent, Redford Morgan. Red is an artist in need of a website and Chloe just so happens to make websites. Could they make a deal?

Get A Life, Chloe Brown had a few things that I liked and a few things I didn’t like. The plot and the characters were definitely original, that’s one thing I liked. There aren’t many romance books out there with a disabled or chronically ill main character, so it was refreshing to read about Chloe and her fibromyalgia. The main characters weren’t very likeable, though, which made it really hard to relate to them. Chloe is just a flat out bitch in the beginning of the book and Red is not much better. Both characters get a little better throughout the book, but they still felt a little flat. The dual point of view gives you a little peek into Redford’s mind every now and then, but he is just not layered that well. He has some kind of anger and trust issues that come from a bad relationship, but he just kind of shuts down and then turns back on again which seems a little flat. The constant going back and forth between “oh she likes me” and “no she hates me” was also a little frustrating and annoying. He would constantly jump to conclusions in a matter of nanoseconds and take it out on Chloe. Chloe’s sisters seemed like a lot of fun, though. They’re pretty much the only likeable characters in the story. Which is good, since the other two books in the series are about them.

The book was definitely funny, amusing and quirky for most of story. Hibbert has a gift for making you giggle out loud. The interactions between Red and Chloe are witty and Chloe definitely has a sharp tongue that makes her interactions with Red fun to read about. These interactions with Red and her sisters are the only reason that this book still gets three stars.

My least favourite thing about this book were the extremely graphic sex scenes. Maybe graphic isn’t really the right word, the fact that it’s graphic isn’t really the problem. The bluntness of the language used and the lack of romance is the problem. I don’t mind a little spice, but the spicy scenes in this book just weren’t tastefully done at all. Why did it need to be so graphical, why did there have to be so much sex in public places and elaborate descriptions of Red jerking off and stuff like that. There is literally no need to write entire paragraphs on how Red really has to jerk off after every time he sees Chloe, because he likes her thighs or her ankles or something. It was just too much. A lot of the scenes made me plain uncomfortable. I would not even call them spicy, some of them were just plain disgusting. I would definitely not recommend this book to anyone under 16.

If someone would ask me whether or not I would recommend this book, I wouldn’t know what I would say. It was enjoyable enough, I guess, but the blunt, distasteful sex scenes just really bothered me. If you’re used to the use of the words “cunt”, “shaft” and “pussy” and you don’t mind scenes where public sex happens out of the blue with no real motivation or cause in a phase of the story when nothing romantic has happened yet, then I would definitely recommend it. If that’s not your thing, don’t read it. I haven’t read the sequels yet, so I can’t tell you if it gets any better, but I’m not really a fan of struggling through a book just because “it gets better” anyway. That’s like 8 hours of your life we’re talking about. Spend them reading something you actually like.

I’m going to keep on reading the series because the next two books are about Chloe’s sisters and they were actually my favourite characters from the book, but I do really hope that the other two books are much less graphic and focused on sex. If the series keeps going in this fashion, it’s going to be a DNF for me. This one already almost was.

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