April 2022 TBR

April 2022 TBR

Good morning fellow bookworms! March has officially ended and the beautiful month of April has begun (also the month of my birthday, so I may be a little biased). I wrapped up my reading month a few days ago in this post, so now it’s time for the next step: setting my April TBR! I’m very much a mood reader, so the chances that I’m actually going to stick with this list are quite slim, but I hope to be able to scratch at least a few of them off!

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

This one is a no-brainer. I finished A Court of Thorns and Roses a few days ago and absolutely loved it, so naturally I am going to read the second book in the series. It’s supposed to be even better than the first book and it has a Goodreads rating of 4.61, which is absolutely crazy, so this is going to be fun!

Take A Hint, Dani Brown by Talia Hibbert

Also kind of a no-brainer, since I finished Get A Life, Chloe Brown in March, although I didn’t enjoy it all that much. I’m gonna give the second book in the series a go, but if it has more of the same unnecessarily graphic sexual content, I’m DNF’ing.

Misery by Stephen King

I’m so excited for this one, though also a little scared since it’s kind of outside of my comfort zone. I used to read a lot of (psychological) thrillers, but I’ve kind of been reading a lot of lighthearted, fun Young Adult, fantasy and romance novels, so we’ll have to see if I’m still into the thrillers. I’ll keep you posted!

November 9 by Colleen Hoover

I’ve devoured two CoHo novels in the past few months and I’ve really been wanting to get my hands on this one. I finally found this one in my local bookshop and I’m so excited. I’ve heard so many good things about it, I can’t wait.

The Comfort Book by Matt Haig

I’ve wanted to read this book for a while now, but I could only ever find Hardcover copies that cost like 25 euros and I didn’t really want to pay that much for such a tiny book, so I decided to wait. I finally found a paperback edition for 9 pounds in the airport bookshop when I was in Nottingham, so I decided to buy it! I just finished Notes on a Nervous Planet and am now reading Reasons to Stay Alive, so I’ll probably start on The Comfort Book after I finish that one. All three books have fairly short chapters, so they’re lovely books to have as a second or third read to pick up when you’ve only got a couple of minutes.

Verity by Colleen Hoover

Same story as November 9 by Colleen Hoover. I finally got my hands on this one a while ago after reading so many amazing reviews. I can’t wait to get started on this one. I’m really looking forward to Ugly Love as well, but I’ve already discovered that I can’t read too many CoHo’s in a short period of time, so it’ll have to wait a little.

Daisy Jones & the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Ever since reading The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, I’ve wanted to read Daisy Jones and the Six. I loved Evelyn Hugo and the plot of Daisy Jones sounds amazing. I finally bought a copy, so let the fun begin!

Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson

Good Girl, Bad Blood was another Birmingham Airport bookshop find and so was the third part of this series, As Good As Dead. Buy 1 get 1 50% off, baby! Anyway, I read A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder last year and absolutely loved it, so I decided that I wanted to read the rest of the series as well. Also, I challenged myself to actually finish some of the series I started this year, so I guess I have no choice!

Current Reads

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

I’m currently at page three-hundred something of the Prisoner of Azkaban for my Rereading Harry Potter series, which means that after tomorrows post, there’s going to be two more weeks/posts of the Prisoner of Azkaban, after which we’ll be starting on the Goblet of Fire. I’m so excited, shit is getting pretty Sirius!

The Twelve Dates of Christmas by Jenny Bayliss

Yes, this is weird. I started this book just before Christmas and I didn’t get the chance to finish it in time, but I don’t want to DNF, because I like the book. So I just thought I’d pick it up again so it doesn’t stay on my shelf half unread until next Christmas.

Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig

I’m about a third of the way through Reasons to Stay Alive. It’s wonderful so far and it’s probably best enjoyed when you read a couple of pages at a time during breakfast or a little coffee break or whatever.

The Gifts of Reading by Jennie Orchard

Might DNF. I’m about 16% in and I’m really bored.. It’s a series of short stories from various writers about gifting books and so far I’ve only enjoyed one of them. We’ll see.

Physical TBR

So I’ve been seeing a lot of people tracking their physical TBR and trying to reduce theirs, so I decided that I wanted to give it a go as well. I took inventory of all of my books, both physical and digital editions and counted how many books were still unread. I came to a grand total of 444 books, out of which 249 are still unread. Naturally, I put myself on a book-buying ban until at least my birthday, because this is absolutely crazy. I’m going to try to reduce my TBR and I’ll keep you guys posted!

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March Wrap-up

March Wrap-up

Hi my lovely bookworms! And thank you for clicking on this reading wrap-up for March. As always, time has flown by and I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s felt that way. March has not been a great reading month for me, due to me falling ill twice and working a lot. I’ve been a little overwhelmed, so forgive me for the list not being as long as you’re used to. Quality-wise it was a pretty good reading month, though, so I’m not too disappointed. Let’s have a look at the books I read in March and then we’ll have a look at some stats and the books I’m currently reading!

March Books

March was an okay reading month for me, I guess. I would’ve loved to read a little more, especially since the Heartstopper novels are quite short, but I guess seven books is not too shabby. In April, I’m gonna go for 10. These are my March 2022 reads:

Get A Life, Chloe Brown (The Brown Sisters #1) by Talia Hibbert

Rating: 3 out of 5.

This was definitely the most disappointing book of the month. I had such high hopes for this, since it was hyped up a lot on Bookstagram, but I didn’t care for it much. I wrote an entire review on it which I’ll link below and in the title, but the explicit content was just way too graphic for my taste and it really got in the way of what would otherwise have been quite an enjoyable book.

All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Loved it. My second CoHo book and it definitely lived up to my expectations. I do need a therapist now, though. Any recommendations?

Heartstopper Volume three by Alice Oseman

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Heartstopper Volume Four by Alice Oseman

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I had to buy volume three and four in this series after finishing the first two in February. These two graphic novels were just as adorable and fun to read as the first two, though they were a little less lighthearted. Especially volume four, where mental health and mental illness are important themes throughout the story. This whole series is wonderful to read.

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I finally gave in to reading the most popular fantasy series on Bookstagram. I have to say, I’m not disappointed. It is definitely living up to its expectations so far. I’ll keep you posted on the rest of the series 😉

Stressvrij Beleggen by Lieuwe Jan Eilander

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I won’t bore you with an elaborate explanation of this book. It’s a Dutch book about investing (literal translation of the title: Stress Free investing). I wanted to know more about investing, so I read it and it was quite boring, though informative.

Notes on A Nervous Planet by Matt Haig

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The last book I finished in March. I became a big fan of Matt Haig’s after reading The Midnight Library last year. This is one of Haig’s nonfiction books about his own experiences with depression and anxiety and how to deal with mental illness in such a fast-paced society.

March Stats

I have read a total of 7 books this month, which brings my total for 2022 so far to 23 books, which is 31% of my Goodreads reading goal.

I have read a total of 2616 pages in March.

All of the books I’ve read in March were between 300 and 500 pages long.

Most of the books I’ve read in March were fiction. Only 2 of them were nonfiction; one was a self help book about mental health and the other was about investing. Am I slowly becoming the dullest person alive? Maybe.

Of the 7 books I read in March, 4 were physical copies and 3 were digital editions. Two of the digital editions were graphic novels and the other was just.. very graphic..

5 out of 7 books were romance novels. That means that every work of fiction I read in March was a romance novel.

My average rating in March was 3.93⭐️. That is slightly lower than my over all average of 4.06⭐️. We’ll do better in April.

Current reads

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

You’re probably going to see a Harry Potter book appear on every monthly wrap-up for the next couple of months, since I’m doing a Rereading Harry Potter series of posts (you may have seen it, if not, you can click on the link). I’m about two-thirds of the way through the Prisoner of Azkaban right now, so I’ll definitely finish that before my April wrap-up.

The Twelve Dates of Christmas by Jenny Bayliss

I know, it’s weird to be reading a Christmas romance novel in spring, but I actually started reading this before Christmas and then I didn’t finish it in time. I put it down for like three months and then I figured it would either become a DNF (because I’m not going to wait a whole year to read the second half of a book) or I would continue right now, so I decided on the latter. I’m about 60% through the book right now, so hopefully it will appear on next month’s wrap-up.

Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig

Okay I’ve discovered that I am a sucker for Matt Haig books. This is my third book by Haig and I’m loving it. His honesty about his own experiences with depression and anxiety are just.. wow. Reasons to Stay Alive was actually written before Notes on a Nervous Planet, but they can both be read separately.

Favourite March Quotes

“If you only shine light on your flaws, all your perfects will dim.”

All Your Perfects, Colleen Hoover

“Apologies are good for admitting regret, but they do very little in removing the truth from the actions that caused the regret.”

All Your Perfects, Colleen Hoover

“And besides, libraries aren’t just about books. They are one of the few public spaces we have left which don’t like our wallets more than us.”

Notes on a Nervous Planet, Matt Haig

“Remember no one really cares what you look like. They care what they look like. You are the only person in the world to have worried about your face.”

Notes on a Nervous Planet, Matt Haig

“Happiness is not good for the economy.

We are encouraged, continually, to be a little bit dissatisfied with ourselves.”

Notes on a Nervous Planet, Matt Haig

“Don’t feel bad for one moment about doing what brings you joy.”

A Court of Thorns and Roses, Sarah J. Maas

“Be glad of your human heart, Feyre. Pity those who don’t feel anything at all.”

A Court of Thorns and Roses, Sarah J. Maas

“I solemnly swear that I am up to no good.”

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J.K. Rowling

“Why, dear boy, we don’t send wizards to Azkaban just for blowing up their aunts.”

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J.K. Rowling

This Months Posts

February Reading Wrap-Up

Rereading Harry Potter – Week 9

Rereading Harry Potter – Week 10

Rereading Harry Potter – Week 11

Heartstopper Volume 1-4 by Alice Oseman

Get A Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert

Rereading Harry Potter – Week 12

All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

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All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

All Your Perfects by Colleen Hoover

Rating: 5 out of 5.
  • Fiction
  • Contemporary Romance
  • New Adult
  • Paperback
  • 305 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 4.31
  • TW: mental health, infertility

Quinn and Graham meet in an entirely improbable way that is probably not the best base for a relationship. Nevertheless, they get together and they are the absolute perfect couple. For a while, at least, until Quinn and Graham start trying to have a baby and it’s just not happening. They stop talking to each other and only have sex for the purpose of having a baby. But every month Quinn will get her period and fall apart all over again.

“If you only shine light on your flaws, all your perfects will dim.”

Colleen Hoover, All Your Perfects

Where do I even start? There are so many good things about this book. This is only my second CoHo book and I am absolutely blown away. First of all, the story is so original. The way that Quinn and Graham meet stirs up so many emotions, it really sets the tone for the rest of the book. Hoover writes her story and her characters in a way that makes you feel like you completely understand what infertility feels like without actually having experience it (luckily). It absolutely broke my heart to read about Quinn’s struggle with not being able to get pregnant. Everything that happens in this book is so well thought out. There is a box that is referred to in the story every once in a while and that keeps you curious (“What’s in the box!”). You eventually find out and it is absolutely perfect. If you must know, yes, I cried.

I’m a sucker for books with dual timelines. It keeps the story exciting and gives you exactly the information you need in a way that doesn’t get boring. Also, it keeps you from needing a therapist. Hoover has a gift for balancing the heartbreaking main story with lighthearted fun stuff from the beginning of Quinn’s and Graham’s relationship.

I came across some writing tips on Pinterest a while ago on how to write a character for your book or story. The main thing that stuck with me was that you shouldn’t make your character too perfect. An interesting character has flaws. Well, Hoover definitely has Pinterest too, because man, her characters have flaws. I’ve never written a book, but I’m guessing that creating characters is probably the most tricky part of writing. If the characters are too perfect, nobody will care, if they’re too flawed, everyone will hate them. The characters in All Your Perfects are perfectly imperfect, if that makes sense. Quinn’s mental issues that derive from not being able to get pregnant and her inability to communicate about it with Graham make her an amazing main character to a heartbreaking book. The imperfectness of Hoover’s characters is what makes this story so perfect.

Colleen Hoover is probably the most talented romance writer on earth. Her books are completely unique, unlike anything I’ve ever read before. After I read It Ends With Us, I thought “Okay, this is really good. Maybe I’ll read more CoHo books in the future, but I’ll probably only be disappointed, because nothing can match this.” I was wrong. This book was incredible, absolutely mind-blowing. If you can get your hands on this book or any CoHo book for that matter, do it. Buy it, read it, tell me what you think.

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Rereading Harry Potter – Week 12

Rereading Harry Potter – Week 12

Good afternoon (for me at least) my fellow bookworms! I hope you’ve all had a wonderful week, I know I have. The sun has been shining all week here in the Netherlands and the sun can always brighten up a day, so I hope you’ve all been having a lot of sunshine wherever you are. Now on to Harry Potter related business. The last thing that happened last week, was the disappearance of the Fat Lady (where did that name come from by the way, it’s not very woke to be honest..). I have a lot tabbed in my book this week, so let’s get started.

After the Gryffindors found the portrait of the Fat Lady empty and ripped to pieces by Sirius Black, Dumbledore appears and leads them all to the Great Hall, where they are later joined by the other three houses. They’re supposed to spend the night there while the teachers search the school for any sign of Sirius Black. The students are left with the Prefects as guards and the Head Boy and Head Girl (Percy and is girlfriend) in charge. Personally, I might have added a teacher or two to that equation, considering that there is a murdering maniac on the loose who is known for killing a bunch of people with a single explosion, but who am I. Obviously Sirius Black wasn’t found, because nobody would be dumb enough to linger after a failed attack. Snape of course thinks that Black had inside help, which is not exactly a strange assumption when you consider that Black and Lupin were good friends in school. Although, since Snape serves Voldemort, he should probably be aware that it was Peter Pettigrew who blew up those people and not Black, right? Or was Pettigrew the only one who knew about that? Well, Snape should at least be aware that Black wasn’t a Death Eater.

After their night in the Great Hall, everyone gets to go back to their own common rooms and Sir Cardogan (remember him from showing the trio the way to the Divination classroom?) temporarily takes the Fat Lady’s place in the portrait. Gryffindor is supposed to be playing against Slytherin that weekend, but Slytherin backed out of the game due to their seeker’s arm still being injured, even though we all know there’s nothing wrong with Malfoy’s arm and he is obviously faking it. This means they’re going to be playing Hufflepuff instead, though and they just got a new seeker and captain.. Cedric Diggory! Did you know he made an appearance in the third book already? I had no idea! I was so excited. I can’t get the image of Robert Pattinson on a broomstick out of my mind.

As you may remember, the Quidditch match didn’t go too well. Harry got attacked by a Dementor and fell off his broomstick, which was smashed to pieces by the Whomping Willow. So Harry ended up in the hospital wing for the weekend and his Nimbus 2000 was damaged beyond repair. Every time they say that something is damaged beyond repair, I’m like.. but what about Reparo? Dumbledore was able to repair an entire house in the Half-Blood Prince, but a piece of wood is too complicated? Could it be because of the enchantments on the broom?

After Harry’s next DADA class, Lupin holds him back to check if he is okay. He tells Harry about the Dementors and about Azkaban. He says that Sirius Black must have found a way to fight the Dementors. My guess is that he had some kind of new found hope of finding Harry and protecting him or something. Let’s hope we’ll find out soon. Lupin agrees to give Harry Dementor lessons, though he will have to wait until next term since Lupin still has to catch up on some work from when he was “ill”.

Just before Christmas, another Hogsmeade weekend comes up. Of course Harry’s not allowed to go, but the Weasley twins have got just the thing to avoid those annoying little things called rules. They give Harry the Marauder’s Map, which shows where everyone at Hogwarts is at any given time, but it also shows the secret passages to Hogsmeade. The only available passage is the one that ends up in the cellar of Honeydukes. So movie-Harry was relatively sensible about breaking the rules and decided to take his invisibility cloak. Book-Harry, though, didn’t much care that he wasn’t allowed to go to Hogsmeade, apparently, and didn’t much care if he was seen. Up until professor McGonagall, Hagrid, Cornelius Fudge and professor Flitwick appeared at the Three Broomsticks, that is. It is here that these three highly intelligent individuals and Hagrid and Madam Rosmerta (she runs the Three Broomsticks) decide that it’s a good idea to talk about Sirius Black loud enough for the three students we know and love a few tables over to be able to hear them. This is the moment Harry finds out that Sirius Black was not only his father’s best friend, but also his godfather AND his parents Secret Keeper. The whole Secret Keeper-thing doesn’t appear in the movie, though, so for those of you who (like me) have no idea what a Secret Keeper is: it’s a complicated spell where a secret is concealed inside a person. Only that person would be able to reveal the secret, in this case that would be the location of the Potters.

I’m still so confused about this whole thing. How did Pettigrew end up being the hero of this story and Black the villain? Pettigrew receives the Order of Merlin and Black ends up in Azkaban. How does the Secret Keeper thing fit into the story if Black wasn’t actually the one who betrayed them? So many questions!

During the Christmas holiday, only Harry, Ron, Hermione and two or three other students remained at Hogwarts. Harry wakes up on Christmas morning to a bunch of presents lying at the foot of his bed, including a brand new broomstick. Someone has sent him a Firebolt, though there is no note with the broomstick. Since they can’t figure out who sent it, Hermione thinks that Harry shouldn’t use is until they have found out who sent it to him. She goes to professor McGonagall, who agrees with her and confiscates the broomstick so that it can be checked for enchantments and jinxes. Both of them think that the broomstick might’ve been sent by Sirius Black.

There’s a feast on the evening of Christmas with just the six remaining students and six teachers. Halfway through, professor Trelawney joins them as well, but she does not dare sit down, for there would be thirteen at a table then (the first one to get up is the first to die). It kind of confused me that McGonagall was bashing and making fun of Trelawney throughout the entire meal, since she is the only one sticking up for Trelawney when Umbridge kicked her out in the Order of the Phoenix. Earlier in the book, she told Harry that Trelawney had predicted a student’s death many times before and no one had died yet, but that seemed like a harmless piece of commentary. This whole scene is just plain mean.

That’s it for this week! I know, I know, but don’t worry. There’ll be more next week when we’re going to resume school in the new year and get some dementor lessons from Lupin (among other things, I haven’t read it yet). Have a great remainder of your weekend and I’ll see you next week!

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Get A Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert

Get A Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert

Rating: 3 out of 5.
  • Fiction
  • Contemporary romance, chick lit
  • Ebook
  • 384 pages
  • Goodreads rating: 3.86

In Get A Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert, Chloe Brown sets herself a challenge to.. well, get a life. Chloe is a chronically ill computer geek who finally moved out of her parents house after almost dying and composing a list of six directives to help her get a life. Number one was moving out: check! Now she has to enjoy a drunken night out, have meaningless sex and go camping, among other things. She has no idea how she’s going to cross all those things off her list, until she meets the building’s superintendent, Redford Morgan. Red is an artist in need of a website and Chloe just so happens to make websites. Could they make a deal?

Get A Life, Chloe Brown had a few things that I liked and a few things I didn’t like. The plot and the characters were definitely original, that’s one thing I liked. There aren’t many romance books out there with a disabled or chronically ill main character, so it was refreshing to read about Chloe and her fibromyalgia. The main characters weren’t very likeable, though, which made it really hard to relate to them. Chloe is just a flat out bitch in the beginning of the book and Red is not much better. Both characters get a little better throughout the book, but they still felt a little flat. The dual point of view gives you a little peek into Redford’s mind every now and then, but he is just not layered that well. He has some kind of anger and trust issues that come from a bad relationship, but he just kind of shuts down and then turns back on again which seems a little flat. The constant going back and forth between “oh she likes me” and “no she hates me” was also a little frustrating and annoying. He would constantly jump to conclusions in a matter of nanoseconds and take it out on Chloe. Chloe’s sisters seemed like a lot of fun, though. They’re pretty much the only likeable characters in the story. Which is good, since the other two books in the series are about them.

The book was definitely funny, amusing and quirky for most of story. Hibbert has a gift for making you giggle out loud. The interactions between Red and Chloe are witty and Chloe definitely has a sharp tongue that makes her interactions with Red fun to read about. These interactions with Red and her sisters are the only reason that this book still gets three stars.

My least favourite thing about this book were the extremely graphic sex scenes. Maybe graphic isn’t really the right word, the fact that it’s graphic isn’t really the problem. The bluntness of the language used and the lack of romance is the problem. I don’t mind a little spice, but the spicy scenes in this book just weren’t tastefully done at all. Why did it need to be so graphical, why did there have to be so much sex in public places and elaborate descriptions of Red jerking off and stuff like that. There is literally no need to write entire paragraphs on how Red really has to jerk off after every time he sees Chloe, because he likes her thighs or her ankles or something. It was just too much. A lot of the scenes made me plain uncomfortable. I would not even call them spicy, some of them were just plain disgusting. I would definitely not recommend this book to anyone under 16.

If someone would ask me whether or not I would recommend this book, I wouldn’t know what I would say. It was enjoyable enough, I guess, but the blunt, distasteful sex scenes just really bothered me. If you’re used to the use of the words “cunt”, “shaft” and “pussy” and you don’t mind scenes where public sex happens out of the blue with no real motivation or cause in a phase of the story when nothing romantic has happened yet, then I would definitely recommend it. If that’s not your thing, don’t read it. I haven’t read the sequels yet, so I can’t tell you if it gets any better, but I’m not really a fan of struggling through a book just because “it gets better” anyway. That’s like 8 hours of your life we’re talking about. Spend them reading something you actually like.

I’m going to keep on reading the series because the next two books are about Chloe’s sisters and they were actually my favourite characters from the book, but I do really hope that the other two books are much less graphic and focused on sex. If the series keeps going in this fashion, it’s going to be a DNF for me. This one already almost was.

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